Drive (2011) 720p YIFY Movie

Drive (2011)

A Hollywood stunt performer who moonlights as a wheelman discovers that a contract has been put on him after a heist gone wrong.

IMDB: 8.070 Likes

  • Genre: Crime | Drama
  • Quality: 720p
  • Size: 707.75M
  • Resolution: 1280*544 / 23.976fps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 100
  • IMDB Rating: 8.0/10 
  • MPR: R
  • Peers/Seeds: 9 / 223

The Synopsis for Drive (2011) 720p

A Hollywood stunt performer who moonlights as a wheelman discovers that a contract has been put on him after a heist gone wrong.


The Director and Players for Drive (2011) 720p

[Director]Nicolas Winding Refn
[Role:Irene]Carey Mulligan
[Role:Shannon]Bryan Cranston
[Role:Driver]Ryan Gosling
[Role:Bernie Rose]Albert Brooks


The Reviews for Drive (2011) 720p


Gosling leads the third generation of serious Hollywood talent.Reviewed byLloyd BayerVote: 7/10

Something about Ryan Gosling caught my eye when I first saw him in "Murder by Numbers". Opposite Sandra Bullock, I was heavily mistaken for underestimating this relatively new actor. After "Fracture", Gosling had my full attention. Not only did he refuse to be outdone by the legendary Anthony Hopkins, Gosling vindicated his star power as an up and coming actor with some serious screen charisma. With "Drive", Gosling smashes it out of the park. The best part? He doesn't even say much in the movie but gets it done through sheer screen presence.

Adapted from a short story of the same name, Gosling plays a nameless Hollywood stunt car driver and mechanic, who also moonlights as a getaway car driver. As the getaway driver, his rules are simple: burglars must finish the job within a five minute window and never contact him for another heist. After helping his neighbor Irene (Carey Mulligan), and her young son, with car trouble, The Driver starts to spend time with them. Just when an air of attraction develops between The Driver and Irene, her husband Standard (Oscar Isaac), is released from prison. From here on, things turn ugly for everyone. Standard owes mobsters money for protection during his time in prison. The Driver helps Standard in what should be an easy 'in-out' heist, but the job is a setup and our hero ends up running the gauntlet with mobsters Bernie Rose (Albert Brooks) and Nino (Ron Perlman).

There are three names that I think deserve high praise for this movie. Aside from Gosling, director Nicolas Winding Refn does a phenomenal job with almost every aspect of this film. There are flaws, some factual and some due to obvious oversight in editing, but in giving Refn the benefit of the doubt, on a whole this movie is one fine piece of work. What works for Refn is the mood he creates when setting up a brooding atmosphere, along with the 1970s period setting. This is the result of seamlessly integrating an exceptional score by Cliff Martinez with intentionally mute moments. Evidently, Refn also pays attention to cinematography that focuses on a first-person perspective, literally putting the viewer in the driver's seat. Even so, you get a feel of the world surrounding The Driver, but his past always remains a mystery. It is this mysterious past, complimented with a haunting atmosphere that gives The Driver an almost super-human personality. Towards the end, this personality makes him appear unstoppable as a man on a mission.

Coming back to characterization, and as I said before, Gosling owns it. He fits snug behind the skin of his character in a way that dates back to the days of a younger and angrier Clint Eastwood. I am not placing Gosling on par with the legend that is Eastwood; rather that Gosling's characterization of an anti-hero is memorable and justifies comparison to the likes of Eastwood, or even Robert De Niro for that matter. When it comes to Mulligan and Gosling in the same frame, the atmosphere shifts to a whole new level arising from just flirtatious eye contact. There is a definite yet restrained sensuality between both characters and even for the few muted scenes they are together, on-screen chemistry is obvious. Another worthy mention is Brooks as the cynical antagonist with a thing for blades. Incidentally, Brooks does it better than Perlman, where both play mafia foot soldiers.

I recommend this as a must watch for its style, story, portrayals and artistic visuals. The narration flows at a steady pace but gradually picks up momentum towards the end and includes some scenes of extreme violence when you least expect it. Thankfully, Refn doesn't dwell too long on scenes of blood and gore.

Fate? Unknown...Reviewed bySpikeopathVote: 7/10

Drive is directed by Nicolas Winding Refn and adapted to screenplay by Hossein Amini from the novel of the same name written by James Sallis. It stars Ryan Gosling, Carey Mulligan, Bryan Cranston, Albert Brooks, Oscar Isaac, Christina Hendricks and Ron Perlman. Music is by Cliff Martinez and cinematography by Newton Thomas Sigel.

Driver (Gosling) has a day job, he's a Hollywood stunt man, but by night he makes the serious cash as a getaway driver for the criminal fraternity. Into his life comes married next door neighbour Irene (Mulligan) and her little boy Benicio (Kaden Leos), pitching him right into the middle of two wars; one is for his emotional worth, the other with the criminal underworld.

Real human being, and a real hero.

They cheered at Cannes, it has garnered instant cult classic status as well as gushing critical praise, Drive is arguably the biggest surprise of 2011. Some would debate that it arrived in a year that was dominated by blockbuster brain drains and pretentious parables, meaning it wouldn't take much for something like Drive to find a favourable audience. Yet Drive is a special movie, the surprise being that it delivers a different film to what the plot synopsis suggests. There would have been many disappointed that it didn't turn out to be something akin to The Fast & The Furious 19, but as its reputation grows, one likes to think that many also had their senses tingled unexpectedly by Refn's western done out in 1980s neo noir attire.

Yes, at first glance it looks like a simple story given over to style over substance leanings, where the fact that our laconic protagonist is not prone to dialogue expansion, could lend argumentative weight to those potential dissenters only skimming the surface of the picture. But the material is in excellent hands, with Refn, Sigel, Gosling and co, calmly unravelling Amini's stripped down screenplay to reveal a gritty urban fable that's laced with ethereal overtones. A picture where a look means more than any words can express, a subtle holding of hands reveals many layers peeling, and then the serene state of play often gets punctured by bouts of shocking violence, yet always it remains a picture big on intelligence, beating a mighty heart in the process.

Propelling the picture forward is the complexity of Gosling's driver character. He has no back story for us to work from, and he gives nothing away outside of the tender bond formed with Irene and child. He is actually one of many purposeful grey areas (or should that be gris areas?) within the plot structure. We learn just enough to be on his side, a noble but flawed hero battling against fate as he fights for the innocent, he be Shane for a modern pot boiling Los Angeles. Helps, too, that he's so cool behind the wheel, where he mines Steve McQueen's effortless charisma. Refn delivers magic moments of car play, from the near ten minute opening getaway extended sequence, to a high speed kill or be killed pursuit, when the action flows it really pumps the adrenalin.

Gosling is amazing, instantly iconic, soft voice matching his soft blue eyes, toothpick perched between teeth, it's a testament to his acting ability that the requisite homages to iconic characters of movies past never veers into parody territory. It's with the calm moments that he triumphs most, be it watching TV with the boy Benicio or just gazing intensely into Irene's eyes, Gosling has a magnetic quality of some significance. Mulligan, too, is wonderful, deftly underplaying Irene to work off of Gosling to create heart aching tenderness, their chemistry superb. Isaac does fine work with the ex-con/husband character that is thankfully not stereotypical, Brooks is Colm Meaney like, thriving on simmering badness, while Cranston puts real heart into the role of Driver's garage boss, the closest thing the Driver has to a pal. The only one dimensional character lands in Perlman's court, but Perlman is such an ebullient and watchable life force the film survives the character's oafness.

From the opening pink neon credits, accompanied by the synth plink of a retro 80s soundtrack (a soundtrack so memorable it lands in the ears and stays there for days), it's evident that Refn is a man who takes his style serious. Drive is full of classy (yes arty) passages, fluid camera movements, single takes, non central framing of characters, slow motion unfurls and eye dazzling chopper shots of a neon lighted L.A., the director has an eye for the quality required to cloak his story. He of course is aided considerably by his editor Matthew Newman, and Sigel's photography. The former is dealing in seamless precision, the latter a master of shades (a lift sequence is to, ahem, die for) and colour toning delights. Marking this out as a Blu-ray essential.

You can name about ten films that Drive has been either likened too or put forward as an influence, and Refn's work here has been touted as an offspring created by Michael Mann, Walter Hill, William Friedkin and Sergio Leone (all viable and all actually high praise indeed). But rest assured, Drive is still fresh and exciting, the perfect movie package. Refn's masterpiece and one of the best films of 2011. 10/10

Film Noir meets Hammer Hardened Hero Maker meets Gangster Heavy MetalReviewed bydoncrawVote: 9/10

Ryan Gosling brings down the hammer on that line where logic reason and self preservation become secondary to protecting what is important to you. There are a few moments where he doesn't just cross that line but obliterates it completely.

Beautifully crafted pounding action thriller with twisted humor and seriously hard core violence. Compelling tenderness from characters that are unsophisticated in the best sense of the word.

This film will go down as one of the best Action films in decades. Car chases that rival and extend beyond Bullitt and French Connection. Violence that bursts out of the screen like a horror film or a bad dream by David Cronenberg. Passing moments of tenderness that are drawn out until you are slowly pulled into the emotional world of the protagonists.

Something so powerful, especially when it works, is the use of sharp and dramatic Camera Angles in Drive that mirror the emotional moment of the story drawing you into the characters world.

View and angles often extremely low angled and tilted sharply upward, effective at expanding the feeling of voyeurism of being at the dinner table or in the adjacent seat, right in the room with the characters while safely looking up from some shadow or nook or cranny. Very emotionally transcendent cinematography.

Night footage was amazingly successful at capturing the range of light and shadows, on a technical level the audio and video were strong and assured. Not only the first robbery but all the way through the film right up to the final resolution of the plot, the night was a familiar environment for major turns in the story (pun intended).

I will return hopefully soon to expand on this review, but I had to write something tonight because this film is ten times more badass than any Transporter or Fast and Furious fare that is usually sold in their all too obvious packaging.

Drive leaves them all in the Dust.

This filmed was viewed on the Big Screen at the LAFILMFEST screening June 17th 2011

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