Hell on Frisco Bay (1955) 720p YIFY Movie

Hell on Frisco Bay (1955)

After 5 years in prison, ex-cop Steve Rollins is paroled and searches for the San Francisco mobsters who framed him for manslaughter.

IMDB: 6.53 Likes

  • Genre: Crime | Drama
  • Quality: 720p
  • Size: 1.20G
  • Resolution: 1280x504 / 23.976 (23976/1000) FPSfps
  • Language: English
  • Run Time: 98
  • IMDB Rating: 6.5/10 
  • MPR: Normal
  • Peers/Seeds: 1 / 0

The Synopsis for Hell on Frisco Bay (1955) 720p

When ex-cop Steve Rollins is released from San Quentin after five years, his only thoughts are of revenge on the men who framed him for manslaughter. Back in San Francisco, his quest for the truth brings him up against ruthless waterfront gang boss Victor Amato.


The Director and Players for Hell on Frisco Bay (1955) 720p

[Director]Frank Tuttle
[Role:]Joanne Dru
[Role:]Alan Ladd
[Role:]Edward G. Robinson


The Reviews for Hell on Frisco Bay (1955) 720p


Watching a star trying hard to wreck his own filmReviewed byLaurence TuccoriVote: 5/10

A film noir shot in colour, in cinemascope, with scenes set mostly outdoors during daylight hours, and making ample use of San Francisco's picturesque landscape, starts out with several counts against it.

But contravention of most if not all of the conventions of the noir genre is the least of this movie's problems.

The biggest drag on the story is its star. Alan Ladd strolls through the plot like a Californian Redwood on legs. If it weren't a clash of materials, it would not be unfair to characterise his woodenness as robotic. There's not an ounce of enthusiasm or conviction in his performance as Steve Rollins, an ex-cop wrongly convicted of manslaughter, who leaves jail vowing vengeance on the gangsters who framed him.

Ridiculously attired in a linen suit that never creases or stains despite several bare knuckle dust ups, he fearlessly provokes corrupt waterfront boss Victor Amato (Edward G Robinson) into a showdown that can only result in death or victory.

Along the way, just to demonstrate what a straight-up, honorable guy he is, Rollins rebuffs his wife (Joanne Dru) for a moment of weakness while he was in jail (but only after he'd refused to let her visit him for three years) and comes to the aid of a nightclub singer (Fay Wray) whose life Amato is threatening. All of which Ladd achieves without once moving a facial muscle.

So thank god for Edward G.Robinson! He singlehandedly saves HELL ON FRISCO BAY with a performance that is considerably better than the film deserves. Robinson's career was in a slump in 1955, mostly as a result of the anti-communist blacklist, and he was no longer getting A-list parts, but he never stopped giving his best to whatever work came his way. He's as great here as he was in 'Little Caesar' and 'Key Largo.' His Victor Amato is a fully-rounded, believable and disturbing character, a psychopath who can charm the parish priest one moment and order the murder of his own nephew the next. When Robinson's on screen it's almost possible to forget he's inhabiting the same story as dreary lifeless Alan Ladd.

Credit is also due to Paul Stewart who makes the most of his underwritten part as Amato's put-upon right hand man, and watch out for an uncredited but instantly recognisable Jayne Mansfield in her last bit part before exploding into America's consciousness with 'The Girl Can't Help It' a few months later.

HELL ON FRISCO BAY is a decidedly mediocre tale but a fine example of an actor proving himself better than the material he's given to work with. Watch this and you may well be put off Alan Ladd for life but you'll definitely want another serving of the wonderful Edward G Robinson.

Read more of my reviews at http://thefilmivejustseen.blogspot.com/

excellent later Ladd pictureReviewed byMartinHaferVote: 7/10

While most of the territory covered in this film has been covered before in countless movies, still this story of organized crime is very watchable and packed with great dialog and lots of action. In fact, this is very much a Film Noir piece, despite its having been filmed in color. Ladd is great as the angry guy seeking out justice (yes, I know it isn't very much of a stretch) and Edward G. Robinson turns in exactly the type of performance that made him famous (once again, not much of a stretch I know). And, overall, the film is very gritty, entertaining as well as great fun to watch. It does lose a couple points for the lack of originality, but considering how well it is put together, it certainly makes up for much of this.

Robinson outshines a wooden Ladd and the wide open spaces.Reviewed byAle fishVote: 5/10

Edward G Robinson dismissed this one with a passing comment in his autobiography and it's not hard to see why. He exudes menace in the classic 'Little Caesar' manner and his interplay with the underrated Paul Stewart does have a touch of real quality. However, Cinemascope is not a process designed for urban thrillers and the wide open spaces rob the film of any sense of tension or claustrophobia. The greatest weakness, however, lies in Ladd's robotic performance. His boredom is evident throughout and the lacklustre supporting cast do little to help. In the end Robinson is left out on his own, gat in hand, the true professional giving it all he's got.

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